Skip to main content

About your Search

20110701
20110731
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)
for the freedoms we all enjoy. they include, of course, those who have died in iraq and afghanistan. in tonight's "making a difference" report, we meet an exceptional group of women who have lost their husbands or fiances in those wars, and have joined forces now to help themselves heal and to embrace life. nbc's peter alexander has their story. >> ready, set, go! >> reporter: they are fun-loving and fearless. a brave group of women with something else in common, too. they are all military widows. who lost their loved ones in iraq and afghanistan. taryn davis was 21 when her husband, michael, was killed by a roadside bomb in iraq in 2007. >> one of the last things i said to him was i love you more than life itself. >> reporter: living without michael is an everyday struggle. >> when i went out into the world i just felt like they didn't want to embrace who i was. which was a military widow. and in the back of my mind, i'm thinking, that title, it symbolizes my husband's sacrifice and my own. and if i can get through it, maybe one day it can signify my survival. >> reporter: to help her own heal
, murder victims, and fallen soldiers. tony just found out that his son james who died in afghanistan in 2006 may not only have had his cell phone hacked into, but also his e-mail. >> they have hacked into a dead soldier, it's despicable. what else would you say? what on earth did they think they were going to find? >> reporter: in the words of the prime minister, people trust the police to protect them, politicians to represent them and the news to inform them. these people have been failed by all three. >>> in the middle east where fridays are typically the biggest day for protests, following friday prayers, hundreds of thousands were out on the streets of syria again demanding regime change, and in egypt, protesters are back in the streets, back in tahrir square. it's been five months now since mubarak was forced out, we were there to cover it. there was so much hope back then, but there's now growing anger over the pace of change and growing concern over who holds the power. our chief foreign correspondent richard engel finds himself back in tahrir square once again tonight. richa
's 170th infantry brigade in afghanistan held its breath on every kick. while around the world, this was the cheer. >> usa! usa! >> usa! >> reporter: in new york's times square. >> they've got the guys rocking the women's jerseys. it feels really good. >> reporter: suburban los angeles. >> i look up to every single one of them. >> reporter: and this frankfurt sports bar where ex-pats and tourists stood for the national anthem. in the twitter verse, thousands of fans tweeted support including justin timberlake, lance armstrong and president obama who watched the game with his family. while in frankfurt, dr. jill biden and chelsea clinton represented the white house. a former soccer mom herself -- >> you must be so excited! >> reporter: -- biden thanked the parents of the team. >> it's the moms and the dads who are behind their children and who get them to where they are today. >> reporter: it was not the ending america hoped for. but for some, it was still satisfying. >> whoever wins, i'll be happy, to be honest. >> reporter: now, japan won the cup and plenty of hearts here in g
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)